Fairchild C-82, C-119 Boxcar, AC-119G Shadow and AC-119K Stinger, XC-120 Pack Plane

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famvburg:

     1/77, IIRC.


Quote from: Jeffry Fontaine on July 31, 2008, 06:31:01 AM

Your ISO containers usually come in two standard sizes.  8.0' X 8.0' X 20.0' and 8.0' X 8.0' X 40.0' with variations on that standard theme in length and height.  The C-119 would be able to accomodate a 20.0' ISO container with ease but that 40.0' container might be sticking out of the back end. 

On another note.  Does anyone remember the old Aurora C-119 kit and what was the scale of that model?  I remember seeing one on the shelf of a hobby shop many years ago, I figure it is about as rare as the 1/48th scale CH-47 Chinook by now. 

joncarrfarrelly:
The belly pod on the XC-120 is easily forty feet long just based on volume and isn't sticking all that far out in front of the aircraft.

XC-120 pod = 2,700 cubic feet

40 foot ISO = 2,560 cubic feet


As to weight, there is no reason and air-mobile ISO container couldn't be aluminum or plastic composite, probably a mix of both.

Jon

Jeffry Fontaine:
Quote from: joncarrfarrelly on July 31, 2008, 03:51:55 PM

The belly pod on the XC-120 is easily forty feet long just based on volume and isn't sticking all that far out in front of the aircraft.

XC-120 pod = 2,700 cubic feet

40 foot ISO = 2,560 cubic feet


As to weight, there is no reason and air-mobile ISO container couldn't be aluminum or plastic composite, probably a mix of both.

The ISO containers are already available in aluminium as well as steel so that would be no problem to strap an alloy ISO container to the XC-120.  I would imagine a need for some kind of strap-on aerodynamic fairing feature for the ISO container to give it slightly less resistance when attached to the carrier aircraft. 


The other reason for making a comment was to add this to the discussion.

How about a turbine conversion for the C-119?  Swap the radial engines out for something a bit more modern and slightly more efficient.  Maybe adapt the RR Tyne to fit on the C-119?  It certainly has a diameter that is very close to the current C-119 engine nacelles so the only real challenge is to determine how best to route the turbine exhaust to exit behind the main landing gear.  Source for the RR Tynes?  Two choices in 1/72nd scale at the moment, bot from Revell of Germany, one is the Breguet Atlantic and the other is the Transall C-160.  The down side is the cost as both kits are quite expensive acquisitions for just parts unless you go in on a joint purchase with someone that has plans for the fuselage sans engines.  A RR Tyne powered C-119 would certainly look interesting as a WHIF in the markings for the  French AdA or one of the Commonwealth Air Forces instead of the Transall C-160, ("What if the Transall C-160 was never produced?").

Reference links:

Wikipedia - C-119 Flying Boxcar
Wikipedia - XC-120 Packplane
Wikipedia - C-82 Packet
Wikipedia - AC-119
Gunships
Gunships - AC-119G Shadow and AC-119K Stinger
Wikipedia - Transall C-160
Wikipedia - Breguet Atlantic
Wikipedia - C-130 Hercules
Wikipedia - AC-130 Spectre
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft - American Military Transport Aircraft
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force
]National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - C-119J Flying Boxcar
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - AC-119K Stinger

famvburg:
 
         Why behind the gear? There should be plenty of room out the side(s) of the nacelle. As for TPs, I'd go for Allisons from a C-130 or P-3. Would the Tyne's cowls be that close anyway? Not having anything handy to compare, anyway. I like the Allisons, tho.

Quote from: Jeffry Fontaine on August 21, 2009, 11:28:03 PM

Quote from: joncarrfarrelly on July 31, 2008, 03:51:55 PM

The belly pod on the XC-120 is easily forty feet long just based on volume and isn't sticking all that far out in front of the aircraft.

XC-120 pod = 2,700 cubic feet

40 foot ISO = 2,560 cubic feet


As to weight, there is no reason and air-mobile ISO container couldn't be aluminum or plastic composite, probably a mix of both.

The ISO containers are already available in aluminium as well as steel so that would be no problem to strap an alloy ISO container to the XC-120.  I would imagine a need for some kind of strap-on aerodynamic fairing feature for the ISO container to give it slightly less resistance when attached to the carrier aircraft. 


The other reason for making a comment was to add this to the discussion.

How about a turbine conversion for the C-119?  Swap the radial engines out for something a bit more modern and slightly more efficient.  Maybe adapt the RR Tyne to fit on the C-119?  It certainly has a diameter that is very close to the current C-119 engine nacelles so the only real challenge is to determine how best to route the turbine exhaust to exit behind the main landing gear.  Source for the RR Tynes?  Two choices in 1/72nd scale at the moment, bot from Revell of Germany, one is the Breguet Atlantic and the other is the Transall C-160.  The down side is the cost as both kits are quite expensive acquisitions for just parts unless you go in on a joint purchase with someone that has plans for the fuselage sans engines.  A RR Tyne powered C-119 would certainly look interesting as a WHIF in the markings for the  French AdA or one of the Commonwealth Air Forces instead of the Transall C-160, ("What if the Transall C-160 was never produced?").

Reference links:

Wikipedia - C-119 Flying Boxcar
Wikipedia - XC-120 Packplane
Wikipedia - C-82 Packet
Wikipedia - AC-119
Gunships
Gunships - AC-119G Shadow and AC-119K Stinger
Wikipedia - Transall C-160
Wikipedia - Breguet Atlantic
Wikipedia - C-130 Hercules
Wikipedia - AC-130 Spectre
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft - American Military Transport Aircraft
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force
]National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - C-119J Flying Boxcar
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - AC-119K Stinger

Jeffry Fontaine:

Hyperscale has posted a few images (33 to be exact) of the Testor's (Italeri) 1/72 scale AC-119K Gunship named "The Super Sow" built by IPMS Guatemala member Eduardo Arguijo.  It appears that Eduardo put a lot of time and effort into this model and it shows in his attention to the small details. 

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